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rush for most expensive caterpillar fungus Keeda Jadi in the Himalayan range

Introduction

Rush for most expensive caterpillar fungus (Keeda Jadi) in the Himalayan range.
The ‘caterpillar fungus’ or keeda jadi grows in Uttarakhand’s high-altitude border districts of Pithoragarh at an altitude of 3,500 to 5,000 metres. Known as the ‘Himalayan Viagra’.

One kilo of top-grade keeda jadi can sometimes fetch as much as Rs. 12 lakhs in illegal cross-border trade.

The fungus harvesting season in Uttarakhand’s high-altitude border districts of Pithoragarh and Chamoli starts in early May and ends by the middle or end of June, with the arrival of the monsoon.

Entire families move to the meadows, staying in tents for weeks, working long and arduous hours to collect the fungus.

And they return with enough fungus to cover a chunk of the family’s expenses for a considerable period of time.

“It depends on how many pieces of keeda jadi you pick. The earnings last for a few months for some families and pro.vide sustenance for some for a year.

About Keeda Jadi

Himalaya is the place of medical plants which cannot be found anywhere else.
Keeda Jadi is basically a fungus that grows as a parasite on the larvae of a particular kind of caterpillar. The fungus evolves in the living larva, which kills and mummifies the larva and then develops as a stalk-like fruiting figure.

Caterpillars take 5 years to grow underground in Alpine grass and shrublands before finally pupating (from larva) and are attacked by the fungus while feeding on roots. It finally takes the shape of 5-15 centimeter columnar mushroom out of the forehead of the caterpillar
Before the villagers discovered the lucrative fungus, they depended on agriculture, daily wage labour or sheep-herding. But agriculture is not a viable option in this rugged landscape. “The land is not fertile; we mostly cultivate rajma and potatoes. If the harvest is good, and that is rare.

Its collection and illegal trade have transformed remote villages of Uttarakhand, where it is found in the wild.

sinensis, Kida Jadi, or Yarsa-gumba, Yarsha-gumba or Yarcha-gumba, यार्सागुम्बा (in Hindi language) is an entomopathogenic fungus (a fungus that grows on insects) in the family Ophiocordycipitaceae.
 
The genus has a worldwide distribution and most of the approximately 400 species that have been described are from Asia (notably Nepal, China, Japan, Bhutan, Korea, Vietnam, and Thailand). Cordyceps species are particularly abundant and diverse in humid temperate and tropical forests

High value and illegal trading Keeda Jadi

Keeda Jadi in natural form
In the global market, Keeda Jadi is worth Rs 18 lakh for a kilogram which is around 3500 and 4500 pieces of fungus.

But in reality, the locals get only Rs 1 or 2 lakh for collecting and selling them. In India, every year families in some regions of rural Kumaon along with their children plod up in the hills of the Himalayas at the altitude of 3500 to 5000 meters to collect the Keeda Jadi. In India, it is found in Chamoli, Uttarakhand, and hilly areas of Himachal Pradesh.
Their high value also leads to the conflict among villages and illegal trade as in India it is not legalized. This rare fungus is only found when summer sets in and snow (glacier) melts at higher altitudes of the Kumaon region and exposes mummified caterpillars. 

People have started using uneven means to collect Keeda Jadi. Sometimes, forests are put on the fire to melt the snow. Such unnatural practices are causing damage to the environment and precious species also
Keeda Jadi

The Story behind the keed jadi Famous world wide.

The demand for yarsagumba reportedly shot up in 1993 when three Chinese athletes broke five world records at the Beijing National Games after regularly consuming a tonic apparently made from the fungus.

In 1999, China classified the fungus as an endangered species. Soon after, the fungus-picking made its way to India.

“In the early 2000s, we saw Tibetan khampas searching for the fungus in pastures on the Indian side. They said it could rarely be found in
Himalan Range

Its advantages and medical usages

1. Cancer Treatment
2. Sexual Health Benefits
3. Stress Reliever
4. Strengths of Kidney and Immune System
5. Increases Stamina
6. Good for Muscles
7. Increases Sperm Count
8. Benefits of asthma and bronchitis patients.

Government Policy For trading Keeda Jadi

The new goverment policy, proposes registering every harvester with the van panchayats (forest councils managed by village communities) or forest range office with their Aadhaar or voter identification card.

The person will disclose the days he/she will spend collecting keeda jadi and in which particular area of the forest range. He/ she also has to disclose the amount of keeda jadi they have collected.

“For every 100 gram, the forest department will charge a royalty of Rs. 1,000. The buyer is then free to sell it to van panchayats or any third party. It then becomes legal to sell it,”.

  “The alpine meadows are ecologically fragile. So when the policy comes into effect, we will know how much it is harvested in the state, and what’s happening in the region.”

Conclusion

I would like to share that Himalayan is the place of medical plants that cannot be found anywhere else in the world.

We have to respect it. If we destroy it, so nature has most destruction power than us , we see time to time recently like face of floods all over the world .

So we forget our personal interest and greed, government have to come with new rules and regulation that help local people get benefited for their earnings and our government earns revenue and illegal trading will stop in future.

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    MAWLYNNONG is the cleanest village of Meghalaya India.

    Today if I asked for anybody in India. Which is the cleanest village in India and Asia? Most of the people do not know the answer to this question, it is ok, but most of the Indian people never think of this type of cleanliness they found in the village of India.

    All we educated people to know everything about hygiene and cleanliness but we forget that important lesson in normal life. That we live in a beautiful country and it is our responsibility for the cleanliness of our nearby surroundings, but we thought the government will take care of this because we pay taxes that kind of selfishness, hypocrisy & ego we most of the Indian have.

    That is why small countries like Taiwan, Hongkong, Singapore, Malaysia, Canada, Dubai do better than us, and when we will travel to such small countries than we feel how dirty our countries and governments can’t do anything. This kind of mindset we develop in our selves even though we learn about hygiene & cleanliness lessons from our childhood.
    Welcome To ‘The Cleanest Village In India’ The East Khasi Hills, Hills of Meghalaya also referred to as ‘God’s own garden’ has won the acclaim of being the cleanest village in Asia in 2003.

    Meghalaya is one of the seven small states of India’s remote northeast region and home to the “Cleanest Village in India.” The mountain road climbs to Mawlynnong, at an altitude of 5,000 feet, giving way to Bangladesh farther south.
    About this village in 2014, there are about 95 households in Mawlynnong approx 700-800 mix of Man, Women, Children, and old people and the literacy rate is 90%.

    The people residing in the community are Khasi people. The population is mostly Christian and the village has three churches.

    Their main occupation is agriculture. Betel nut being the main crop of this village or region. During summers, one can find pineapples and lychees which are then exported to the nearby regions as well.
    Today Mawlynnong is known for its cleanliness worldwide. The main question comes in my mind if this village person not very filthy rich so how can they do this kind of job cleanliness or the government support them.

    But my friends these people not very well educated but they have the determination to work for their village to clean that kind of motive and passion change the economics of this village.

    Every day in the morning the wastes are collected in the dustbins made of bamboo, directed to a pit, and then used as manure.

    A community initiative mandates that all residents should participate in cleaning up the village.

    Smoking and the use of polythene are banned while rainwater harvesting is encouraged.

    The travel magazine Discover India declared the village as the cleanest in Asia in 2003, and the cleanest in India in 2005.

    This reputation has boosted local tourism; in 2017 according to the village headsman, incomes had increased by 60 percent due to increased tourism.
    They have a very beautiful ritual as is the tradition of the Khasi people, in Mawlynnong property and wealth are passed from the mother to the youngest of her daughters, who also keeps the mother’s surname.

    Mawlynnong proves that women empowerment and 100 percent literacy rate, both are achievable. Extending warm hospitality to their guests also happens to be one of the most well-known qualities of the natives of Mawlynnong.
    The Living Root Bridges in Mawlynnong have been declared a UNESCO World Heriassive
    The Living Root Bridges in Mawlynnong have been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Hanging on a river, the bridges are made by connecting the aerial roots of one massive rubber tree with another.
    The best part about the food you eat in Mawlynnong is that all of it is prepared using organically grown vegetables. Even the meat comes from in-house bred birds and animals.
    There is a wide variety to vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes to savor; pick from pork tossed in bell peppers and greens, freshly-cut and smoked banana-flower, Jadoh – meat and rice-based delight), and Tungrymbai – a sumptuous mesh of fermented soybeans, bamboo leaves, and local spices.
    In Mawlynnong, you’ll find some nice homestays that allow you to stay close to nature and have a lovely time with the locals. Some homestays are traditionally-built huts, while a few are built from concrete.

    In Mawlynnong accommodation is simple, and comes with basic facilities. Recommended Mawlynnong guesthouses/homestays: Ila Jong Homestay, Bangladesh View Homestay, Hala Tyngkong, Epiphany Society Guest House, & Sahpyngngad Homestay.The average cost per night: INR 2000.
    After attaining the title of the Cleanest Village in Asia, Mawlynnong became a popular tourist attraction. Well-connected to major cities like Shillong and Cherrapunji, Mawlynnong can be easily reached by road. Here are different ways to reach the village:

    By road: Roads towards Mawlynnong are majorly in good condition. You can easily find buses plying between the village and nearby areas like Cherrapunji and Shillong.
    By air: Nearest airport from Mawlynnong located in Shillong, at a distance of 78 km. There are direct flights from Kolkata to Shillong. However, if you’re coming from other cities like Delhi, you’ll have to go for a connecting flight. On reaching the airport, you can hire a taxi or board a bus to reach Mawlynnong
    By rail: Guwahati is the nearest major railway station from Mawlynnong, 172 km away. Opt for a bus ride or taxi from the station in order to reach the village.
    The best months to visit Meghalaya is between October and June. Early summer and winter are quite pleasant.
    But due to heavy rainfall during monsoons, a lot of tourists avoid visiting from July till September.

    Rating: 1 out of 5.