Tag Archives: District

rush for most expensive caterpillar fungus Keeda Jadi in the Himalayan range

Introduction

Rush for most expensive caterpillar fungus (Keeda Jadi) in the Himalayan range.
The ‘caterpillar fungus’ or keeda jadi grows in Uttarakhand’s high-altitude border districts of Pithoragarh at an altitude of 3,500 to 5,000 metres. Known as the ‘Himalayan Viagra’.

One kilo of top-grade keeda jadi can sometimes fetch as much as Rs. 12 lakhs in illegal cross-border trade.

The fungus harvesting season in Uttarakhand’s high-altitude border districts of Pithoragarh and Chamoli starts in early May and ends by the middle or end of June, with the arrival of the monsoon.

Entire families move to the meadows, staying in tents for weeks, working long and arduous hours to collect the fungus.

And they return with enough fungus to cover a chunk of the family’s expenses for a considerable period of time.

“It depends on how many pieces of keeda jadi you pick. The earnings last for a few months for some families and pro.vide sustenance for some for a year.

About Keeda Jadi

Himalaya is the place of medical plants which cannot be found anywhere else.
Keeda Jadi is basically a fungus that grows as a parasite on the larvae of a particular kind of caterpillar. The fungus evolves in the living larva, which kills and mummifies the larva and then develops as a stalk-like fruiting figure.

Caterpillars take 5 years to grow underground in Alpine grass and shrublands before finally pupating (from larva) and are attacked by the fungus while feeding on roots. It finally takes the shape of 5-15 centimeter columnar mushroom out of the forehead of the caterpillar
Before the villagers discovered the lucrative fungus, they depended on agriculture, daily wage labour or sheep-herding. But agriculture is not a viable option in this rugged landscape. “The land is not fertile; we mostly cultivate rajma and potatoes. If the harvest is good, and that is rare.

Its collection and illegal trade have transformed remote villages of Uttarakhand, where it is found in the wild.

sinensis, Kida Jadi, or Yarsa-gumba, Yarsha-gumba or Yarcha-gumba, यार्सागुम्बा (in Hindi language) is an entomopathogenic fungus (a fungus that grows on insects) in the family Ophiocordycipitaceae.
 
The genus has a worldwide distribution and most of the approximately 400 species that have been described are from Asia (notably Nepal, China, Japan, Bhutan, Korea, Vietnam, and Thailand). Cordyceps species are particularly abundant and diverse in humid temperate and tropical forests

High value and illegal trading Keeda Jadi

Keeda Jadi in natural form
In the global market, Keeda Jadi is worth Rs 18 lakh for a kilogram which is around 3500 and 4500 pieces of fungus.

But in reality, the locals get only Rs 1 or 2 lakh for collecting and selling them. In India, every year families in some regions of rural Kumaon along with their children plod up in the hills of the Himalayas at the altitude of 3500 to 5000 meters to collect the Keeda Jadi. In India, it is found in Chamoli, Uttarakhand, and hilly areas of Himachal Pradesh.
Their high value also leads to the conflict among villages and illegal trade as in India it is not legalized. This rare fungus is only found when summer sets in and snow (glacier) melts at higher altitudes of the Kumaon region and exposes mummified caterpillars. 

People have started using uneven means to collect Keeda Jadi. Sometimes, forests are put on the fire to melt the snow. Such unnatural practices are causing damage to the environment and precious species also
Keeda Jadi

The Story behind the keed jadi Famous world wide.

The demand for yarsagumba reportedly shot up in 1993 when three Chinese athletes broke five world records at the Beijing National Games after regularly consuming a tonic apparently made from the fungus.

In 1999, China classified the fungus as an endangered species. Soon after, the fungus-picking made its way to India.

“In the early 2000s, we saw Tibetan khampas searching for the fungus in pastures on the Indian side. They said it could rarely be found in
Himalan Range

Its advantages and medical usages

1. Cancer Treatment
2. Sexual Health Benefits
3. Stress Reliever
4. Strengths of Kidney and Immune System
5. Increases Stamina
6. Good for Muscles
7. Increases Sperm Count
8. Benefits of asthma and bronchitis patients.

Government Policy For trading Keeda Jadi

The new goverment policy, proposes registering every harvester with the van panchayats (forest councils managed by village communities) or forest range office with their Aadhaar or voter identification card.

The person will disclose the days he/she will spend collecting keeda jadi and in which particular area of the forest range. He/ she also has to disclose the amount of keeda jadi they have collected.

“For every 100 gram, the forest department will charge a royalty of Rs. 1,000. The buyer is then free to sell it to van panchayats or any third party. It then becomes legal to sell it,”.

  “The alpine meadows are ecologically fragile. So when the policy comes into effect, we will know how much it is harvested in the state, and what’s happening in the region.”

Conclusion

I would like to share that Himalayan is the place of medical plants that cannot be found anywhere else in the world.

We have to respect it. If we destroy it, so nature has most destruction power than us , we see time to time recently like face of floods all over the world .

So we forget our personal interest and greed, government have to come with new rules and regulation that help local people get benefited for their earnings and our government earns revenue and illegal trading will stop in future.

    Dear All Readers,

    I would like to thank you for continuous support to like our content. The main motto that we have to promote India Travel and Tourism, Food, Art& Culture, lifestyle, Health & wellness. India is a very versatile country. It has a vast history.

    Please share your comment below mention comment section your comment are valuable for us. And like us on Face book, Twitter, Instagram.

    WORLD FAMOUS SUN TEMPLE, OF GUJARAT.

    Introduction Great Sun temple Of Gujarat

    The Modhera Sun Temple was made by King Bhima I of the Chalukya dynasty in the early 11th century. Sun Temple Modhera’s Gujarat. Temple and its dedication to the Sun God will leave you stunned. The temple was so constructed that during every equinox, the first sun rays would fall on a diamond placed on the Sun God’s head and the entire temple would illuminate in a golden glow.

    On other days, two pillars before the garbhagriha would stay illuminated throughout the day, regardless of the position of the sun. All of these can only be left to the imagination now.

    History Of The Sun Temple

    The Sun Temple is a Hindu temple dedicated to the solar deity Surya located at Modhera village of Mehsana district, Gujarat. India. It is situated on the bank of the river Pushpavati. It was built after 1026-27 CE during the reign of Bhima of the Chalukyas dynasty.

    The Temple Complex Has Three Components 

    The temple complex is built in (Chaulukya style). The temple complex has three axially aligned components; the shrine proper (garbhagriha) in a hall (gudhamandapa), the outer or assembly hall (sabhamandapa or rangamandapa), and a sacred reservoir (Kunda).

    The Sabhamandapa is not in continuation with Gudhamandapa but is placed little away as a separate structure. Both are built on a paved platform.[1] Their roofs have collapsed long ago leaving behind a few lower-most courses. Both roofs are 15′ 9″ in diameter but are constructed differently. The platform or plinth is inverted lotus-shaped.
    1.)Gudhamandapa, the shrine hall:-

    The Gudhamandapa measures 51 feet 9 inches by 25 feet 8 inches. It is almost equally divided into Gudhamandapa, the hall, and Garbhgriha, the shrine proper. Both are rectangular in plan with one projection on each of the smaller sides and two projections on each of the longer sides. These projections on the smaller sides form the entrance and the back of the shrine.
    2.)Sabhamandapa, the assembly hall:-

    Sabhamandapa or Rangamandapa, the assembly hall or dancing hall is parallelogram in plan with rows of pillars opening entrance on each side diagonally. The extensively carved exterior has a series of recessed corners giving an impression of the star-like plan of it.[There are 52 intricately carved pillars. Madhusudan Dhaky has suggested that the sabhamandapa may have been later addition based on style and construction.
    3.)Kunda, the reservoir:-

    Kunda, a tank or reservoir is known as Ramakunda or Suryakunda. The flight of steps through kirti-torana leads to the reservoir. It is rectangular. It measures 176 feet from north to south and 120 feet from east to west. It is paved with stones all around. There are four terraces and recessed steps to descend to reach the bottom of the tank. The main entrance lies in the west. There are steps to reach from one terrace to another on the right angle to the terrace. These steps are rectangular or square except for the first step of each flight of steps which is semicircular. Several miniature shrines and niches in front of the terrace-wall have images of gods including many Vaishnavite deities and goddesses such as Shitala.
    However, the sabha mandap still stands on 52 pillars, depicting the 52 weeks in year carvings of the sun, along with its unity with the other 4 elements-air, water, earth, and space- can be spotted on the walls.
    The halls have intricately carved exterior and pillars.
    The reservoir has steps to reach the bottom and numerous small shrines.

    What Is The Specialty Of Sun Temple of Modhera?

    The Sun Temple is a Hindu temple dedicated to the solar deity Surya located at Modhera village of Mehsana district, Gujarat, India. It is situated on the bank of the river Pushpavati. It was built after 1026-27 CE during the reign of Bhima I of the Chalukyas dynasty.
    No worship is offered now and is a protected monument maintained by the Archaeological Survey Of India. At present, the temple is undertaken by the Archaeological Survey of India for renovation and restoration. In 2014, this Modhera Sun Temple was added to the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

    Have A Look at Mr. Narendra Modi Tweet.

    Originally tweeted by Narendra Modi (@narendramodi) on August 26, 2020.

    How Many Sun Temples Are There In India?

    There are only 2 sun temples built in India. One is in Konark, Odisha, and others in Modhera, Gujarat.

    Who Destroyed Sun Temple Jammu & Kashmir?

    Martand is another Sanskrit synonym for Surya. Now in ruins, the temple is located five miles from Anantnag in the Indian union territory of Jammu and Kashmir. The temple was destroyed on the orders of Sultan Sikandar Butshikan, as part of his efforts to forcibly convert Kashmiri people to Islam.

    Uttarardha Mahotsav’

    The Tourism Corporation of Gujarat organizes an annual three-day dance festival known as ‘Uttarardha Mahotsav’ at the temple during the third week of January, following the festival of Uttarayan.
    The objective is to present classical dance forms in an atmosphere similar to that in which they were originally presented.

    How To Reach Modhera Gujarat?

    By Air: You can fly to the nearest city to Modhera-Ahmedabad-from where regular government bus services are available.

    By Train: For the ones boarding a train instead, the nearest railway station is at Mehsana-25 km from Modhera.

    By Road: Modhera Sun Temple can be easily reached by boarding a bus or hiring a taxi from anywhere in Gujarat. The Modhera Sun Temple indeed leaves you awestruck. It is one place, amidst all the ruins, where you’ll find a perfect blend of ageless creativity and tremendous hard work.

    Rating: 5 out of 5.
    Nitin Raj

    Hi ,
    I hope hope you like this article. Please share your views and comments and like us on Facebook and on twitter, Instagram.

    Valmiki Tiger Reserve National Park Bihar

    Valmiki Tiger Reserve

    Valmiki National Park is among the most prominent tiger reserves in India. Located near the Indo-Nepal border in West Champaran district of Bihar, the tiger reserve is spread over an area of about 880 sq km.

    The Valmiki Tiger Reserve comprises of the Valmiki National Park and the Valmiki Wild Sanctuary. It is the 18th tiger reserve in the country and with 10 tigers ranks fourth in terms of tiger population.

    In 1978, the reserve had an area of 464 sq km. In 1989, the national park and wildlife sanctuary was added to the area of the reserve and in 1990 the total area of the reserve was increased to the existing 880 sq km area.

    Best months to see the Valmiki wilderness:

    October to March is the best time to visit the sanctuary. The winter months (December to mid-February) are colder and the minimum temperature goes down to 7 – 8 degrees Celsius.
    Heavy warm clothing is desired in winter.

    Floral Diversity:

    The mixed moist deciduous vegetation along the alluvial plains of the Gandak River is dominated by sal (Shorea robusta), Rohini (Mallotus phillipensis) and sihor (Strebulus asper). Terminalia tomentosa, Terminalia belerica, Adina cordifolia, Dalbergia latifolia, Mitragyna parviflora, Ehretia laevis, Angeissus latifolia are some of the important associates of Sal forests.
    The natural forests are interspersed with plantations of teak (Tectona grandis), bamboo, semal (Salmalia malabarica), shisham (Dalbergia sissoo) and khair (Acacia catechu).

    Faunal Diversity:

    Diverse habitats of the Sanctuary support a variety of faunal life forms. Tigers, Leopards and Indian Wild Dogs are the large predators. Leopard cat and fishing cat are also found in patches. Deer species are represented by spotted deer, sambar, barking deer and hog deer. Indian bison (Gaur), Nilgai and wild boar are other ungulates found in these forests. Rhesus macaque and common Langur are primates of the sanctuary. Zoological Survey of India (ZSI) has recorded fifty three mammal species in the sanctuary.

    Python, crocodile, king cobra, krait, monitor lizard, hill turtle are some common reptiles. The ZSI has recorded 10 species of amphibians, 27 species of reptiles and 75 species of insects.

    Accommodation

     Valmiki Vihar, a tourist lodge of State Tourism Development Corporation Hotel is located at the picturesque site at Valmiki Nagar.  

    There are ten (10) eco-huts of double bed occupancy located at Valmikinagar (two), Naurangia Done (two), Manguraha (2) and Gobardhana (four). Besides, one tree-hut is located at kotraha for altitude lovers.

    Forest Rest Houses (two double-bed rooms in each) are located at Kotraha, Madanpur, Naurangia Done, Gobardhana, Manguraha, and Manpur. Four double-bed rooms at Ganauli is a wooden forest rest house. This building has the potential to get heritage status.

    Tickets and Surcharges

    Booking for accommodation can be done only 60 days in advance and only for 4 days at a stretch.

    Eco hut- Gobardhana: INR 1500 (Maximum two persons allowed in a room)
    Eco hut- Kotraha: INR 1500 (Maximum two persons allowed in a room)
    Eco hut- Naurangia : INR 1500 (Maximum two persons allowed in a room)
    Eco hut- Manguraha: INR 1500 (Maximum two persons allowed in a room)
    Treehut- Gobardhana : INR 1500 (Maximum two persons allowed in a room)

    Safari Details and Charges

    Gypsy/ Jeep Safari (4 persons) for 2 hours 30 minutes – INR 600 per group
    Rafting (8 persons) for 3 hours – INR 2000 per group
    Boating (4 persons) for 3 hours – INR 500 per group
    Nature Walk (4 – 6 persons) for 3 – 4 hours – INR 100 per person
    Border Trek (10 – 15 persons) for 10 – 12 hours – INR 500 per person
    Jungle Camp (4 – 6 persons) for a night – INR 200 per person
    Tiger Trail (4 – 6 persons) for 3 – 4 hours – INR 200 per person
    Cycling – INR 20 per hour

    Places of Interest at Valmiki National Park

    The place is dotted with temples, shrines and historical monuments. Some of the prominent and must-visit attractions of Valmiki National Park include-
    1. Bheriyari Watch Tower

    This one is located in the Bheriyari Grassland region and is ideal for bird watching several exotic bird species at play and viewing the herbivores in the natural habitat.

    2. Bhikhna Thori

    Located exactly on the Indo- Nepal Border, this is the north- eastern end of the sanctuary. This is a popular route to Tibet across Nepal. History tells us that it was the common resting place called ?thaur? in the native language, for the Buddhist monks and hence it is called “Bhiktchuk thaur” or “Bhikhna thori”. King George Vth rested here on his way to Nepal and it has been a popular picnic and leisure spot ever since.

    3. Rohua Nala

    Rohua Nala is a tributary of River Gandak and is situated in the Mandalpur range. The region is a beautiful combination of wetlands, forests, swamps and cenebrakes. The region has been declared as an Important Bird Area (IBA) by the Indian Bird Conservation Network. Besides several beautiful sightings of exotic birds, the place also facilities boating activities in traditional Shikara boats. You can also spot rhinoceros in the region.

    4. Kapan

    Kapan is a major perennial river originating from the Raghia Range. Walking northwards along the river, you can witness one of the most beautiful trails of the Park with forest on the side and the trailing river in the centre. You can also spot kingfishers, green pigeons and Indian bisons here.

    5. Lalbhitiya

    Lalbhitiya is a most beautiful vantage point in the area providing an alluring bird’s eye view of pure- sal forests. The highlight of the place are the mesmerising sunrise and sunset views. On clear days, you can also see the snow white pearly peaks of the Himalayas from here. The place is a common favourite among solace seekers, nature wanderers and bird watchers.

    6. Manor Trek

    Manor Trek is a comparatively easy trek of 1.5 kms which the tourists can undertake on their own. The trail passes along the forest to the Manor watchtower which provides majestic views of the adjoining snow clad Himalayas and beautiful panoramas of the river manor below.

    7. Parewa Dah

    Parewa Dah is considered the most beautiful spot of the Valmiki Natural Forest and a trip to the park is considered incomplete without a visit to this place. Parewa means ?pigeons? and ?dah? means water- bodies and put together, Parewa Dah means a place where both these factors co-exist. The area is replete with water doves,pigeons and bee-eaters swarming the emerald blue waters. The water is so clear that you can even see the fish swimming at shallow levels.

    8. Someshwar Peak

    Perched at an elevation of 2884 meters, Someshwar Peak is the highest peak in the region which can be reached through a trek of 14 km from the base camp. Although the tiring trekking pays off at the top which offers sweeping views of the forest below in the backdrop of the mighty mountains of the Himalayan Range. The path has several stop points like the Titanic Point and Hill Top etc. On the border is located Someshwar Temple dedicated to Shiva and Kali. At the base of the temple are the ruins of the hermitage of Baba Bhatrihari.

    9. Valmiki Nagar

    Valmiki Nagar is the adjoining tiny town of Valmiki Nagar on the banks of river Gandak at the Indo – Nepal border. The Gandak Barrage has a viewpoint that offers magnificent views of the Triveni and other nearby areas. The area also offers rare sightings of gharials, dolphins, crocodiles, turtles, and other rare and endangered birds, etc. Besides the serene landscape and tranquility, you can also experience river rafting in the area.
    Valmiki National Park

    Activities at Valmiki National Park

    1. Nature Walk

    The rich wildlife and the diverse topography makes for wonderful nature walks through the forests. The volunteers are taken on a guided walking tour spanning 4 – 5 km to give them an idea of the flourishing ecosystem of the forests. These groups of 5 – 6 people are guided by professionals and children below the age of 15 years are not allowed. It is a must-experience activity when at the sanctuary to witness the plenteous flora and fauna, and to be awed at the grand and cozy forests brimming with wondrous bounteous nature.
    2. Border Trek

    Located at the brink of the India- Nepal border with the Someshwar Range as the border between the two countries, the wildlife sanctuary provides facilitates beautiful treks in the region. From the top of the hill peaks, one can take a mesmerizing bird’s eye view of the tiger reserve and the national park, in addition to the parallely located Chitwan National Park in Nepal. The trek is a day-long activity, conducted from 7:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Besides testing your fitness agility and grit, the trek takes you through a wonderland of steep slopes, settling riverine, meandering streams, and along with narrow passes in the forests. The package includes packed meals en-route. This trek is conducted in groups of 10 – 15 people led by a professional guide. Children below the age of 15 years are not allowed.
    3. Jungle Camp

    This is one of the most thrilling activities at the camp which is conducted in the anti-poaching camps or in one of the watchtowers. The package includes beds, spotlights, and night vision devices. Special care is taken not to disturb the natural habitat of the plants and animals. Midnight creeks and howls of the wild animals are sure to get up your adrenaline rush. In a group, 2 – 4 people can be accommodated and children below 15 years are not allowed.
    4. Tiger Trail

    One of the most exciting highlights of Valmiki National Park is the Tiger trail activity. The trek starts early at dawn in the supervision of the tiger trekkers where you follow the trails walked by the king of the forest- Bengal tigers. In case it is your lucky day, you might get to see a kill or the spoils of the tigers. The trek is also very informative where the participants are taught how to identify various pugmarks, scratches, and scents. The group consists of 4 – 6 participants and children below 15 years are not allowed.
    5. Watchtowers

    There are several wooden watchtowers housed in the forests from where the tourists can take a peek into the privacy of the wildlife. Besides the towers offer enchanting views of the rivers, the confluence, and the majestic Himalayan ranges. These watchtowers are also installed at Thori, Bajani, Singha Sonbarsa, Bherihari, and Bhaluthapa.

    How to Reach

    Through Railways:

     The sanctuary is situated on Gorakhpur–Muzaffarpur (via Narkatiganj) rail route. Direct trains are available from major cities of the country to reach the sanctuary. Daily/weekly trains are available from New Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Siliguri, Dehradun, and Amritsar to arrive at Bagaha (to reach the western part of the sanctuary) and Narkatiaganj (to reach the central and eastern part of the sanctuary). Muzaffarpur and Gorakhpur are the nearest major junctions to get passenger/mail/express trains for Bagaha and Narkatiaganj. The Field Directorate located at the district headquarters of West Champaran at Bettiah, about 70 km from the sanctuary, is also on the same rail route.
    Road Approach:

     The sanctuary is about 275 km from Patna, the capital city of Bihar; 200 km from Muzaffarpur, major city and railhead of North Bihar; 70 km for Bettiah, district headquarters of West Champaran; and 125 km from Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh, by road. Vehicles can be hired from these places to reach the sanctuary.
    Nearest Airports:  

    Patna, Kolkata, and Gorakhpur.

    Rules and Regulations

    Valmiki National Park observes a vast set of rules and regulations.
    Liquor consumption or visiting under the influence of liquor is strictly prohibited.

    Teasing or disturbing animals in their natural setting is prohibited.
    Damage to any plants or trees is not allowed.

    Smoking or carrying any inflammable material is not allowed.

    Playing any kind of music or any musical instrument during any treks or safaris is prohibited.

    Carrying and consuming food in the forests is not allowed.
    Carrying ammunition or any arms is strictly prohibited.

    Pros & Cons. –

    Pros: Clean, unexplored, well maintained Eco huts and helpful staff of the forest department.

    Cons: Connectivity and availability of any conveyance. (U have to depend on the vehicle of forest Department) Lack of trained guide. Non-availability of Jungle Safari at Naurangia Done.

    Rating: 1 out of 5.
    Like this story? Or have something to share? Write to us: nitinraj5@live.com, or connect with us on Facebook and Twitter.
    NEW: Click here to get positive news on WhatsApp!
    Help us grow our Positive Blogs Movement

    We at The Better India want to showcase everything that is working in this country. By using the power of constructive blogging, we want to change India – one story at a time. If you read us, like us and want this positive blog movement to grow, then do consider supporting us via the following buttons:

    The Chitrakote Falls In Chhattisgarh.

    Today I would like to share about my readers India is a country which has several unique temples famous for its cultural heritage, various wildlife sanctuaries and it is surrounded by the Indian Ocean, Himalayas, the Bay of Bengal, and the Arabian Sea.
    If you are thinking of how you can enjoy the beauty of international destinations via domestic travel? You have to visit The Chitrakote Falls in Chhattisgarh.
    Chitrakote Falls
    The Chitrakote Falls (also spelled ChitrakoteChitrakot, and Chitrakoot; Hindi: चित्रकोट जलप्रपात) is a natural waterfall on the Indrvati River, located approximately 38 kilometers (24 mi) to the west of Jagdalpur, in Bastar district in the Indian state of Chhattisgarh. 
    The height of the falls is about 29 meters (95 ft).  It is the widest fall in India, reaching a width of nearly 300 meters (980 ft) during the monsoon season. Because of its width and its widespread horseshoe shape during the monsoon season.

    It is often called the “Niagara Falls of India”.
    Just from the lush green cover of the forest to the presence of mystic caves, Jagdalpur is surprisingly filled to the brim with places that are of interest to travelers.

    The best part is, the destination is relatively unexplored right now, and offers travelers a very unique chance of exploring an offbeat destination.
    While Chhattisgarh may have a bad rep when it comes to safety (for women and generally) while traveling, Jagdalpur is a serene and peaceful town that is perfectly safe for visitors, including women.
    While it may look tempting, swimming at Chitrakoot waterfalls is extremely dangerous and thus, prohibited.

    Since tourism is a freshly growing industry, Chitrakoot is currently facing a scarcity of restaurants that serve decent food.

    There have also been reports of shops near the falls selling expired goods such as biscuits and wafers. For this reason, it is strongly recommended to carry your own food and water when you visit Chitrakoot Falls.
    The later months of monsoon (September and October) are best suited for exploring Jagdalpur. At this time, the weather is pleasant and thanks to the recently passed monsoon showers, the waterfalls in the area are flowing in all their glory. Keep in mind that this is the peak season of visiting the area and thanks to the combination of high tourist footfall and underdeveloped tourism infrastructure, finding decent accommodation may turn out to be a challenge.
    However, the Naxalite activities—mostly limited to the border areas of the state—often deter travelers from visiting areas like Bastar. … With the exception of a few incidents, Bastar is no more perilous than other places. Raipur and Jagdalpur are as safe as any other Indian city.
    Seven Tourist Places Near Chitrakoot Falls. If you’re visiting (or in) Chitrakoot, have already paid a visit to the falls, here are a few other tourist places near Chitrakoot Falls:

    1. Kanger Valley National Park
    Established in 1982, the young national park of Kanger Valley is an absolute delight for the nature lovers. The national park is less than a couple hour-long drive from the falls and makes for a perfect day-long getaway for those that have the luxury of time.

    2. Kailash And Kutumsar Caves
    discovered (1993) Kailash Caves. The cave system is a small one, only 250 meters in length but nonetheless, offers some spectacular views of stalactite and stalagmite formations. The reason behind naming the caves Kailash Caves is that at the end of the cave, the stalagmite formations resemble a Shivling. Another interesting thing about the Kailash caves is the acoustic properties of its walls that emit a sound when struck by hands.

    3. Tirathgarh Waterfalls

    At a distance of about 35 kilometers from the city center of Jagdalpur, this waterfall is considerably close to Kutumsar Cave. The waterfall area is surrounded by lush green forest and is a favorite picnic spot among the locals and thus, is one of the famous tourist places near Chitrakoot Falls. For those looking for a bit of extra adventure, there is an option of going to the bottom of the gorge formed by the waterfall. The bottom can be reached by climbing down a flight of 210 stars. This staircase is well maintained and is very easy to navigate for people of all age groups and fitness levels.

    4. Zonal Anthropological Museum
    Established in 1972, the museum features an impressive collection of artifacts, art, weapons, utensils, ornaments, clothes collected from the tribe during the 70s and 80s. The museum has efficiently placed these artifacts in a manner that describes a narrative of the “Adivasi” lives of the Bastar Tribe, before the onslaught of infrastructure revolution in the area.

    5. Gupt Godavari

    Gupt Godavari is a pair of caves that have a rich mythological story attached to them. According to Hindu Mythology, the caves were used by Lord Rama and his brother Lord Lakshman to hold secret meetings.
    With grandness comparable to famous Indian caves such as the Elephanta Caves, the Gupt Godavari caves are relatively unexplored by tourists.

    6. Bharat Milap Temple

    Those familiar with the Epic Ramcharitmanas written by Sage Valmiki know about an even called Bharat Milap. For those that are not familiar with the event, it took place after the death of King Dashratha, father of Lord Rama. The then ruling king, King Bharata, brother of Lord Rama, came down to Kamadgiri Mountain to persuade his elder brother to return to their homeland in Ayodhya and reclaim the throne.

    7. Kalinjar Fort

    Located at a distance of about 88 kilometers from Chitrakoot, the Kalinjar Fort is an ancient archeological marvel that offers spectacular views of the plains around it. Rising a little over 1200 feet from the ground, the Kalinjar fort was built by the Chandela Kings in the 9th century. Historically, the fort was viewed as a symbol of great power among local Indian kings, and thus, attracted a lot of conflict over the control of the area.
    The fort also houses a number of temples within its premises, including a shrine will wall inscriptions depicting Lord Shiva, Ganesha, Hanuman, and Kala Bhairon and thus, has emerged as an important pilgrimage destination for Hindus all over the country.
    1.      By Air. The nearest airports are Allahabad (135 km from Chitrakoot), Khajuraho( 175 km) and Varanasi (275 km).

    2.      By Train. Karvi is the nearest railway station and it is 8km away from Chitrakoot.

    3.      By Road. State-owned buses are available from Allahabad, Banda, Kanpur, Satna, and Jhansi to reach Chitrakoot.

    Rating: 1 out of 5.

    Jatayu Sculpture A Myth Comes Alive

    When you see this picture you all were curious about this green forest all around and bird sculpture on the mountain. A lot of questions come into your mind.
    So friends the picture you see that is in the post that is from India. This great park developed by Karnataka Tourism.
    With the opening of the Jatayu sculpture at Chadayamangalam in March 2018, India will be home to the world’s largest bird sculpture.
    Jatayu Sculpture A Myth Comes Alive
    I know a lot of Indians don’t know about Chadayamangalam village in Kollam district, Kerala but we all know about Ramaya and everybody knows about Jatyu. How important role play by Jatayu. He is fighting with Ravan to try to save Sita but somehow Ravan injured him and the giant eagle of the Ramayana fell on the rocky peak. Thereafter, the place came to be known as ‘Jatayumangalam’. Over the years, it became Chadayamangalam and the peak became Jatayupara (Jatayu rock).
    Now, friend, I would like to share this amazing ECO diversity park name that is called Jatayu Earth Center. The sculpture, along with the adventure center and a Siddha healing center, all of 65 acres, form the Jatayu Earth’s Centre
    Mr. Rajiv Anchal Sculptor Of this beautiful of art
    What is Jatayu Earth’s Centre?

    Jatayu Earth’s Centre is a ₹100 crore eco-tourism project designed on a BOT (build-operate-transfer) model between the Government of Kerala and Guruchandrika Builders and Property, a company owned by Rajiv Anchal.
    The company has leased the Government-owned land for 30 years. Although the project took flight in 2008, construction began only by 2011. The Jatayu sculpture, a building with a 15,000 sq ft floor area, is made of roller-compacted concrete (RCC), except for the talons which are stainless steel.
    Mr. Rajiv Anchal Sculptor/filmmaker who made this beautiful sculptor.
    He presented for this sculpture to the Department of Tourism during his Fine Arts College days in the 1980s.
    Later, when a proposal for an eco-tourism project came up, he was approached to work on it.
    As per Mr. Rajiv Jatayu died protecting a woman’s honor and that is what the sculpture stands for.
    Imagination and creativity take flight on this bleak mountain and a giant bird is beginning to spread its wings. Lying flat on its back with wings spread across 150ft, while stretching 200ft from tail feathers to head, and talons rising 70ft into the air, the Jatayu sculpture — built on top of the 1,000ft-high Jatayupara — towers above the green expanses of Chadayamangalam.
    For Anchal, it’s not just another tourism project. There was a time when man and wildlife lived in harmony, and Jatayu is a symbol of that time. “The aim is to protect the rock and preserve Nature around it. Nothing dominates the rock — as all the construction, including the sculpture — is designed and textured to seem like a part of the landscape,” he says.

    Most of the area was barren when the project kicked off. Trees were planted well ahead, and today, the fallen Jatayu lies in a green haven, something straight out of Treta Yuga!
    Jatayu Sculpture
    The sculpture and the cable car ride will be opened to the public. Visitors can scale the wings of the Jatayu to reach the chest and click a selfie with the bird.
    The entry fee will be ₹250. after the completion of the museum, the theatre, and a Siddha healing center.
     
    Reaching the zenith: Apart from the 500-meter cable ride, there is a 1.5-km granite stone walkway built by 70-year-old stonemason Balan Pillai, who chiseled 60,000 stones by himself. A heli-taxi service will be launched in the future.
    Brave the rocks: From climbing up an 82feet rock-face and rappelling down a 45feet cliff, to crossing a tricky Burma bridge and trekking up a mountain, the Jatayu Adventure Centre offers all this and more.

    Built onto a side of the peak, it offers a variety of activities designed around the natural rock formations. For a group of 10, the cost is ₹3,500 and includes lunch, water, juice, and snacks.

    Rating: 1 out of 5.