Tag Archives: Chamoli

rush for most expensive caterpillar fungus Keeda Jadi in the Himalayan range

Introduction

Rush for most expensive caterpillar fungus (Keeda Jadi) in the Himalayan range.
The ‘caterpillar fungus’ or keeda jadi grows in Uttarakhand’s high-altitude border districts of Pithoragarh at an altitude of 3,500 to 5,000 metres. Known as the ‘Himalayan Viagra’.

One kilo of top-grade keeda jadi can sometimes fetch as much as Rs. 12 lakhs in illegal cross-border trade.

The fungus harvesting season in Uttarakhand’s high-altitude border districts of Pithoragarh and Chamoli starts in early May and ends by the middle or end of June, with the arrival of the monsoon.

Entire families move to the meadows, staying in tents for weeks, working long and arduous hours to collect the fungus.

And they return with enough fungus to cover a chunk of the family’s expenses for a considerable period of time.

“It depends on how many pieces of keeda jadi you pick. The earnings last for a few months for some families and pro.vide sustenance for some for a year.

About Keeda Jadi

Himalaya is the place of medical plants which cannot be found anywhere else.
Keeda Jadi is basically a fungus that grows as a parasite on the larvae of a particular kind of caterpillar. The fungus evolves in the living larva, which kills and mummifies the larva and then develops as a stalk-like fruiting figure.

Caterpillars take 5 years to grow underground in Alpine grass and shrublands before finally pupating (from larva) and are attacked by the fungus while feeding on roots. It finally takes the shape of 5-15 centimeter columnar mushroom out of the forehead of the caterpillar
Before the villagers discovered the lucrative fungus, they depended on agriculture, daily wage labour or sheep-herding. But agriculture is not a viable option in this rugged landscape. “The land is not fertile; we mostly cultivate rajma and potatoes. If the harvest is good, and that is rare.

Its collection and illegal trade have transformed remote villages of Uttarakhand, where it is found in the wild.

sinensis, Kida Jadi, or Yarsa-gumba, Yarsha-gumba or Yarcha-gumba, यार्सागुम्बा (in Hindi language) is an entomopathogenic fungus (a fungus that grows on insects) in the family Ophiocordycipitaceae.
 
The genus has a worldwide distribution and most of the approximately 400 species that have been described are from Asia (notably Nepal, China, Japan, Bhutan, Korea, Vietnam, and Thailand). Cordyceps species are particularly abundant and diverse in humid temperate and tropical forests

High value and illegal trading Keeda Jadi

Keeda Jadi in natural form
In the global market, Keeda Jadi is worth Rs 18 lakh for a kilogram which is around 3500 and 4500 pieces of fungus.

But in reality, the locals get only Rs 1 or 2 lakh for collecting and selling them. In India, every year families in some regions of rural Kumaon along with their children plod up in the hills of the Himalayas at the altitude of 3500 to 5000 meters to collect the Keeda Jadi. In India, it is found in Chamoli, Uttarakhand, and hilly areas of Himachal Pradesh.
Their high value also leads to the conflict among villages and illegal trade as in India it is not legalized. This rare fungus is only found when summer sets in and snow (glacier) melts at higher altitudes of the Kumaon region and exposes mummified caterpillars. 

People have started using uneven means to collect Keeda Jadi. Sometimes, forests are put on the fire to melt the snow. Such unnatural practices are causing damage to the environment and precious species also
Keeda Jadi

The Story behind the keed jadi Famous world wide.

The demand for yarsagumba reportedly shot up in 1993 when three Chinese athletes broke five world records at the Beijing National Games after regularly consuming a tonic apparently made from the fungus.

In 1999, China classified the fungus as an endangered species. Soon after, the fungus-picking made its way to India.

“In the early 2000s, we saw Tibetan khampas searching for the fungus in pastures on the Indian side. They said it could rarely be found in
Himalan Range

Its advantages and medical usages

1. Cancer Treatment
2. Sexual Health Benefits
3. Stress Reliever
4. Strengths of Kidney and Immune System
5. Increases Stamina
6. Good for Muscles
7. Increases Sperm Count
8. Benefits of asthma and bronchitis patients.

Government Policy For trading Keeda Jadi

The new goverment policy, proposes registering every harvester with the van panchayats (forest councils managed by village communities) or forest range office with their Aadhaar or voter identification card.

The person will disclose the days he/she will spend collecting keeda jadi and in which particular area of the forest range. He/ she also has to disclose the amount of keeda jadi they have collected.

“For every 100 gram, the forest department will charge a royalty of Rs. 1,000. The buyer is then free to sell it to van panchayats or any third party. It then becomes legal to sell it,”.

  “The alpine meadows are ecologically fragile. So when the policy comes into effect, we will know how much it is harvested in the state, and what’s happening in the region.”

Conclusion

I would like to share that Himalayan is the place of medical plants that cannot be found anywhere else in the world.

We have to respect it. If we destroy it, so nature has most destruction power than us , we see time to time recently like face of floods all over the world .

So we forget our personal interest and greed, government have to come with new rules and regulation that help local people get benefited for their earnings and our government earns revenue and illegal trading will stop in future.

    Dear All Readers,

    I would like to thank you for continuous support to like our content. The main motto that we have to promote India Travel and Tourism, Food, Art& Culture, lifestyle, Health & wellness. India is a very versatile country. It has a vast history.

    Please share your comment below mention comment section your comment are valuable for us. And like us on Face book, Twitter, Instagram.

    Valley of Flowers Heaven on Earth

    Introduction

    This article is about the Valley of Flowers National Park is an Indian national park, located in North  Chamoli and Pithoragarh, in the state of Uttarakhand and is known for its meadows of endemic alpine flowers and the variety of flora.
    Valley Of Flower

    About The National Park

    Valley of Flowers National Park is an Indian national park, located in North Chamoli and Pithoragarh, in the state of Uttarakhand and is known for its meadows of endemic alpine flowers and the variety of flora and rare animals.

    The valley was declared a national park in 1982 and now it is a World Heritage Site.

    Valley of Flowers, located at 12,000 feet, was accidentally discovered in 1931, by mountaineers Frank S SmytheEric Shipton, and  RL Holdsworth, while returning after an expedition to Mount Kamet.  Smythe returned later and wrote the book The Valley of Flowers in 1938.

    The Himalayan valley that has long been acknowledged by renowned mountaineers, botanists, and in literature.

    It has been recognized internationally for over a century and is referenced in the Hindu religion Local people have visited the valley since ancient times.

    Indian yogis are known to have visited the valley for meditation. 
    Famous for its exotic varieties of medicinal herbs, it is also believed that Hanuman brought Sanjivani to the ailing Lakshmana from the valley of flowers

    The Valley of Flowers has many different colorful flowers, taking on various shades of colors as time progressed.

    Unique about the Valley of Flowers.

    The Valley of Flowers is famous for its outstanding natural beauty, endangered animals, and endemic alpine flowers.

    This valley comes under the national park category of India. It is spread over an area of around 88 km². Beautiful waterfalls, landscapes, and meadow add more stars to the beauty of Valley of Flowers.
    Valley of Flowers National Park

    Is Valley of Flowers safe?

    It is always safe while you travel in Uttarakhand as locals are humble and polite.
    As Valley of Flowers trek is quite demanding, therefore tourists should be physically and mentally fit for the trek.

    How do I plan a trip to Valley of Flowers?

    The best idea is to reach Joshimath or Govindghat and stay at night. Morning can start tracking from Govind ghat to Ghangria (Around 18 KM) and again stay at night. One can choose horse riding and save energy for the next day ( tracking in flower valley) .

     Is the Valley of flowers worth visiting?

    The Govindghat to Ghangariya and the Hemkund Sahib treks can be quite putting off to those looking for peace and quiet and cleanliness.

    The name given to it the Valley of Flowers is very true as there are flowers and flowers during summertime. In winter one will find snow and only snow here.
    Ghangaria Village

    Places To Visit In Valley Of Flowers

    Valley of Flower National Park:-

    A World Heritage Site, Valley of Flowers is probably one of the most beautiful places on Earth. The spread of colorful flowers against the snow-capped mountains during spring is a must-see.

    Fauna and Flora:-

    The Himalayan snow leopard is the major attraction of Nanda Devi National park amidst the valley of flowers and mountain ranges. Other animals found here are the endangered Asiatic black bear, blue sheep, and brown bear.

    Ghangaria Village:-

    Ghangaria is arranged at the intersection of the streams Bhyundar Ganga and Pushpawati, which shapes Lakshman Ganga, which later meets the waterway Alaknanda at Govindghat. It is the last human residence in the Bhyundar valley.

    This place is typically utilized by voyagers as a base camp to visit Hemkund and Valley of blooms.

    Hemkund Sahib

    Well, known journey site for Sikhs which is around 6 km from here, and the Valley of Flowers, a national stop known for its assortment of blossoms around 3 km from here. It is situated in the northern Himalayan reaches an elevation of 3049 meters in the Uttarakhand territory of India.
    Hemkund Sahib

    Best Time To Visit Valley of Flowers.

    The valley opens on June 1 each year and shuts in October. The best time to visit the Valley of Flowers is between July to September when you can see the valley at this bloom with flowers. August is the best time to see the flowers bloom; however, it might get difficult to reach there due to landslides and heavy rainfall. 

    How to reach valley of flowers?

    The closest you can get to The Valley of Flowers by road is Govind Ghat. This requires around an 11 hour drive to Joshimath from Dehradun, then another one hour to Gobindghat. From Gobindghat it is a 13-kilometer (8.1 miles) trek along a steep, narrow, but well-defined mountain trail to base camp at Ghangaria.

    Conculison Of this beautiful post

    My suggestion to all my readers you have to visit this famous Valley of flower national park and explore the naturally beautiful garden made by God. Famous for its exotic varieties of medicinal herbs, it is also believed that Hanuman brought Sanjivani to the ailing Lakshmana from the valley of flowers.

    Not- Be a responsible tourist and do not leave anything behind in the valley. Do carry back all the packaging material/ waste and wrappers along with you and dump it at Ghangaria